Wild Rice

Growing up, the family dinner typically consisted of meat, vegetables, and a starch. With great regularity, rice filled the starch bill. White rice. The kind that took very little time to cook on the stove top. Unfortunately, white rice doesn’t pack much of a nutritional punch. Here’s how 1 cup of cooked white rice stacks up against a comparable amount of brown and wild rice:

Glutinous
White Rice

Medium-Grain
Brown Rice

Wild Rice

Calories
Protein
Dietary Fiber

169
3.5 g
1.7 g

218
4.5 g
3.5 g

166
6.5 g
3.0 g

% of Recommended Daily Allowance

Thiamin
Riboflavin
Niacin
Vitamin B6
Folate
Iron
Magnesium
Phosphorus
Potassium
Zinc
Copper

2%
1%
3%
2%
0%
1%
2%
1%
0%
5%
4%

13%
1%
13%
15%
2%
6%
21%
15%
4%
8%
8%

6%
8%
11%
11%
11%
5%
13%
13%
5%
15%
10%

wild riceThough I don’t eat much rice these days, I generally opt for wild rice. It’s second only to oats in protein content and adds a respectable amount of dietary fiber to a meal. It has 10 times the antioxidants of white rice. It contains phytonutrients (phenolic acid and sinapic acid) that are protective against heart disease, stroke, and cancer. It’s also alkaline-forming and gluten free.

Nutrition makes the case for wild rice, but taste and texture seal the deal. When cooked properly, it has a chewy outer sheath that covers a tender inner grain with a slightly nutty taste.

When serving wild rice with a meal, give yourself a lead time of roughly 50 minutes for preparation. You won’t be fussing with it much, but it needs time to cook.

Put 3 cups of water on the stove top with a bit of salt and get it to a rolling boil. Add 1 cup of dried rice, put a lid on the top, turn the burner to low, and simmer for about 45 minutes until fully cooked. Fluff it up when finished.

Once cooked, wild rice can be stored in the refrigerator for up to a week or for a few months in the freezer.